If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Our reason for creating WWK originated as an outlet for our love of reading and writing mystery fiction. We hope you love it, too, and will enjoy our holiday gifts to our readers with original short stories to celebrate the season. Starting on 11/16 stories by Warren Bull, Margaret S. Hamilton, Paula Gail Benson, Linda Rodriguez, KM Rockwood, Gloria Alden, and E. B. Davis will appear every Thursday into the New Year.


Our November Author Interviews: 11/8--Ellen Byron, and 11/15--Sujata Massey. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.


November Saturday Bloggers: 11/4 Margaret S. Hamilton and 11/11 Cheryl Hollon.


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017 and "Turkey Underfoot," just published, will appear in the anthology The Killer Wore Cranberry: a Fifth Course of Chaos.


James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Friday, October 23, 2015

Moving

                                                              




                                                                        Moving
by Warren Bull

We are getting ready to move from Kansas City, Missouri to Portland, Oregon.  We just put our house on the market.  A photographer is coming this morning to take pictures for the listing. 


We have been busy hiding all signs of human habitation.  Family photos are permitted but unwashed dishes, open books, or anything related to eating, excreting, and laundry should be out of sight.

I suppose the idea is to allow potential buyers to fantasize about how they would fit in the space without reminding them of the fact that messy people already live here. Viewers may have a different work process than my — leave everything I will need on the floor close to the computer so I can grab it as needed — system. 

To me it looks like someone has put my belongings into a house that resembles the one I used to live in, but clearly it is not mine.  It is too manicured and orderly. We have been notified that when someone wants to view the house we are obligated to skedaddle.  When I want something, I have to remember if it is something to be hidden or something allowed to be visible.  If it is hidden, I have to remember which hiding spot it is in so I can retrieve it.  I am trying to develop the habit of returning what I exhumed to its hiding place so cleaning and fleeing are easier. 


Preparing the presentation was tiring.  Although we have been throwing things away and donating whatever someone else might like for the last couple of years, we had/still have entirely too much stuff.  Could I interest you in a slightly shabby couch? 

10 comments:

Grace Topping said...

If nothing else, Warren, making your house seem like someone else's home helps you separate emotionally from it. It's hard leaving a place that has been a large part of your life. When moving, I always found that once our things were removed from our house, it was a lot easier to leave it. You are going on to the next chapter in your life. Good luck with your move, and I hope you will be very happy in your new home.

James Montgomery Jackson said...

The only good move is a complete move. Best of luck with the process, Warren. Enjoy Portland.

~ Jim

Margaret Turkevich said...

I agree with Grace. Once your house has been neutralized and stripped of personal items, you no longer live there.

Shari Randall said...

Portland sounds great, Warren. With great change comes great opportunity. Did someone say that?
I won't take the couch, but can I interest you in a piano? Talk about hard to give away…
Best wishes for much happiness in your new home.

Gloria Alden said...

Warren, this is why my moving days are over. I'll only leave my home on a stretcher or in a casket. I've lived in 6 places before this - one for only several weeks - and none more than
5 or 6 miles from where I grew up. However, I'm sure you'll enjoy Oregon and being near to your family. It's a beautiful state.

Kara Cerise said...

Portland sounds wonderful, Warren. Best of luck with the move and may it go smoothly for you.

E. B. Davis said...

I feel your pain, Warren. We aren't as far along in the process, but next year we will be. I'm not looking forward to it for all the reasons you've stated. Good luck--bet you'll love Portland. Is there a SinC Chapter nearby?

Susan Brandt said...

When I've moved, I'm usually tempted to torch my old place because my closets insist on breeding stuff as if they were rabbits. Hang in there.

Valerie Moon said...

We'll miss you at Border Crimes, Warren. KC's loss is Portland's gain, and I envy your move to the Pacific Northwest. We were privileged to live there in the 1970s. (no yearly invasions of tornadoes!!!)

As a lifelong military-gypsy until we moved to KC, I know all too well the process of moving. Despite that, I've never had to sell a house I was living in--military authorities frown on people in quarters trying to make a buck on the deal. With all the tension of enforced order so that it doesn't look as if you live there, I hope your house sells soon. I'd come up to have a look, but, like, we've got this house here ...

Best wishes on your journey.

Dee Hendershot Gatrell said...

Warren, I feel your pain. We have moved several times, and I hate it.
I have a cousin who lives in Portland, OR. What made you decide to move there? Just curious. My cousin has been there many years and loves it.

Good luck with the sale of your house and your move.