If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our April author interviews: Perennial author Susan Wittig Albert--4/5, Sasscer Hill, horse racing insider--4/12, English historical, cozy author, TE Kinsey--4/19, Debut author, Susan Bickford--4/26.

Saturday Guest Bloggers in April: Heather Baker Weidner (4/1), Christina Hoag (4/8), Susan Boles (4/29). WWK Saturday bloggers write on 4/15--Margaret S. Hamilton and on 4/22--Kait Carson.

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th. In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on June, 13, 2017. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with Linda here in June!

Cross Genre Publications anthology, Hidden Youth, will contain Warren Bull's "The Girl, The Devil, and The Coal Mine." The anthology will be released in late November 2016. The We've Been Trumped anthology released by Dark House Press on September 28th contains Warren Bull's "The Wall" short story and KM Rockwood's "A Phone Call to the White House." KM writes under the name Pat Anne Sirs for this volume.

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Friday, October 9, 2015

KUDOS TO ROBERT B. PARKER

KUDOS TO ROBERT B. PARKER

by Warren Bull






Spoiler Alert: If you haven’t read SCHOOL DAYS by Robert B. Parker, I suggest you stop reading this blog.  Read the book.  Come back to the blog.  What I want to write about gives a large part of the suspense away.

The resolution of the novel hinges on an adult woman having sex with a barely adolescent male.  The author correctly describes that behavior as sexual abuse of a minor.  In my thirty years as a clinical psychologist I have seen men who when they were young were sexually abused by adult women. The abuse damaged the self-esteem of the men I saw.  It contributed to their difficulty in forming healthy loving relationships with women. 

No thinking person excuses the damage done to girls molested by men.  However there are still serious misconceptions about boys seduced by women.  Reactions such as “he got lucky early” or “I wish it had happened to me” by men make it harder for men who were molested as boys to talk about what happened.  I knew one woman who bragged about seducing an adolescent.

There are movies and books that express a young man’s coming of age by his having sex with an older woman.  It is an extremely common male fantasy.  Nothing in our culture tells young men that they should refrain from the activity, or consider why an adult woman would be interested in boys rather than men.  Nothing in our culture even hints at the damage it can do.

It would have been easy for the author to go with the “he got lucky” distortion of reality.  So I salute the late Robert B. Parker for writing about sexual abuse as sexual abuse.


Mysteries can deal with social issues and still be entertaining.  Can you mention a mystery that highlighted a social concern?

8 comments:

Margaret Turkevich said...

My current WIP, a traditional mystery, has a substantial subplot about high school bullying and sexual assault.

I'll read the Parker book.

Jacqueline Seewald said...

I haven't read that particular book by Parker. But thank you for bring it to our attention, Warren.

E. B. Davis said...

I didn't read your blog, Warren, as I love Parker. I read his first YA, was this a second one he wrote before he died?

Kait said...

Good blog, Warren. Disturbing topic to say the least. When I was growing up a lot of late teen-aged males (I managed to grow up in a neighborhood of all boys-I think I served as the mascot) bragged about encounters with older women. At the time, I remember thinking they were full of it. Now, in retrospect, I have to wonder how much was fact and how much was wishful thinking. Parker was always a wonderful writer, and bits and pieces of his stories always on the edge.

The Warbler said...

Ridley Pearson's "The Art of Deception" deals with teenage runaways and the reasons they run to strangers for help. Strangers who in turn are sexual predators and worse.
It was written back in '02-I always wanted to say that, is 'spot on' in today's world. - Dennis

Lesley Diehl said...

I love Parker's work especially his ability to say in one sentence what it would take other pages to say. I miss him. I think part of his understanding of these painful psychological/emotional issues can be partly attributed to his relationship with his wife, a therapist. I've never read any portrayal better of a psychiatrist than that of Susan in his books.

Grace Topping said...

I'm pretty much a cozy reader, but I make an exception for Parker. I discovered his books at Sleuthfest when Ace Atkins spoke about being selected by the Parker family to write in the style of and under the name of Robert Parker. His presentation was so terrific that I first got a book by Parker in order to compare it to Spencer book by Ace Atkins. I was impressed by both. And I'm with Lesley, I really like his character Susan. I also read that Reed Coleman is continuing Parker's Jesse Stone series.

KM Rockwood said...

Haven't read it yet! It's on my tbr list.