If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our June author interviews: Fish Out of Water Authors--6/7, Susan Van Kirk--6/14, Renee Patrick--6/21, and Joanne Guidoccio--6/28.

Saturday Guest Bloggers in June: 6/3--Geoffrey Mehl, 6/10--Joan Leotta. WWK Saturday bloggers write on 6/17--Margaret S. Hamilton and on 6/24--Kait Carson.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.”

In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on October, 18, 2017. Look for the interview by E. B. Davis here on that date!

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Friday, May 1, 2015

Is This a Golden Age of Crime Fiction?



Is This a Golden Age of Crime Fiction?

I believe it is.  For one thing, writers considered literary like Joyce Carol Oates and Margaret Atwood choose to write genre fiction.  For another, crime fiction anthologies such as the Akashic Noir series seek short stories from poets and acknowledged literary writers to include in their books.
Currently crime writing covers a multitude of approaches and prose styles, covers many different themes and sometimes references other literature.  Among authors described as literary are Louise Penny, Daniel Woodrell and Kate Atkinson.  Note:  Your list might well differ from mine.

I also think the quality of crime fiction by itself is sufficient to label the current era as a golden age. Elmore Leonard, Walter Mosely and Carolyn Hart among others are writers that I believe will still be read a century from now.

I find it interesting that the very idea that literary crime fiction exists generates strongly emotional responses on both the pro and con side of the proposition. 


What do you think? 

2 comments:

Kara Cerise said...

This is so interesting, Warren. It may be the Golden Age of crime fiction which is an exciting thought. I predict that some of today's authors will still be read in the future and a few stories made into movies.

KM Rockwood said...

Crime fiction probably always has been with us, in stories told around the campfire, and probably always will be, but you're right, Warren. At this point the genre is being taken pretty seriously.