If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Check out our February author interviews: 2/7-debut author Keenan Powell (Alaskan lawyer), 2/14-Leslie Wheeler (Rattlesnake Hill), 2/21-bestselling author Krista Davis, who unveils a new series, 2/28-Diane Vallere answers my questions about Pajama Frame. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.


Our February Saturday Guest Blogger Schedule: 2/3-Saralyn Richard, 2/10-Kathryn Lane. WWK's Margaret H. Hamilton will blog on 2/17, and Kait Carson on 2/24.

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


In addition, our prolific KM has had the following shorts published as well: "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017 and "Turkey Underfoot," appears in the anthology The Killer Wore Cranberry: a Fifth Course of Chaos.

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Friday, May 1, 2015

Is This a Golden Age of Crime Fiction?



Is This a Golden Age of Crime Fiction?

I believe it is.  For one thing, writers considered literary like Joyce Carol Oates and Margaret Atwood choose to write genre fiction.  For another, crime fiction anthologies such as the Akashic Noir series seek short stories from poets and acknowledged literary writers to include in their books.
Currently crime writing covers a multitude of approaches and prose styles, covers many different themes and sometimes references other literature.  Among authors described as literary are Louise Penny, Daniel Woodrell and Kate Atkinson.  Note:  Your list might well differ from mine.

I also think the quality of crime fiction by itself is sufficient to label the current era as a golden age. Elmore Leonard, Walter Mosely and Carolyn Hart among others are writers that I believe will still be read a century from now.

I find it interesting that the very idea that literary crime fiction exists generates strongly emotional responses on both the pro and con side of the proposition. 


What do you think? 

2 comments:

Kara Cerise said...

This is so interesting, Warren. It may be the Golden Age of crime fiction which is an exciting thought. I predict that some of today's authors will still be read in the future and a few stories made into movies.

KM Rockwood said...

Crime fiction probably always has been with us, in stories told around the campfire, and probably always will be, but you're right, Warren. At this point the genre is being taken pretty seriously.