If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Check out our February author interviews: 2/7-debut author Keenan Powell (Alaskan lawyer), 2/14-Leslie Wheeler (Rattlesnake Hill), 2/21-bestselling author Krista Davis, who unveils a new series, 2/28-Diane Vallere answers my questions about Pajama Frame. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.


Our February Saturday Guest Blogger Schedule: 2/3-Saralyn Richard, 2/10-Kathryn Lane. WWK's Margaret H. Hamilton will blog on 2/17, and Kait Carson on 2/24.

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


In addition, our prolific KM has had the following shorts published as well: "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017 and "Turkey Underfoot," appears in the anthology The Killer Wore Cranberry: a Fifth Course of Chaos.

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Friday, January 23, 2015

Walking With Lillian








Walking with Lillian

It had been a long time since I walked with a small child.  Given the chance to walk with Lillian, her Mama and my wife so we could meet Dada I accepted gratefully.  As we all walked I was able to watch her mother and later her father display good parenting, which I always find utterly satisfying. 

I had forgotten many things such as:

To a two-year-old wearing boots means we should be walking in the snow and not on the shoveled sidewalk.

Each successive puddle is a new opportunity to splash.

Even with the goal of meeting Dada, a walk is a series of jaunts toward interesting items and people heading, more or less, in the general direction of Dada’s office.

Fallen leaves sitting on deep snowdrifts are more appealing than leaves on the cleared sidewalk.

Aunties and uncles are fun to chase. 

And finally:

Doggies poop on the sidewalk, which is of great interest to tiny people involved in potty training. 





Have you walked with a small child recently? 

I am away from my computer today, but I will look at the comments as soon as I can.

6 comments:

E. B. Davis said...

Great observations, Warren. The blog reminded me of when my children were little. When they were newly born, I thought of them in the "cat" stage-somewhat responsive and not particularly interested in anything but satisfying their own needs.

At two, they were in the "dog" stage. This isn't derogatory, but it is an acknowledgement of the development a child undergoes. Your description of walking your niece could have been that of walking a dog. Jumping through puddles, taking detours, wanting to chase, etc.

Each stage is precious and important for a child. Taking the time to participate, giving them the feedback so they learn the stage's lesson, and enjoying the person they are becoming helps them on their way.

James Montgomery Jackson said...

I like EB's observations. I hadn't thought of the maturation process in terms of cat and dog stages.

I'm suspecting that at the end of life we revert to the beginning stage and like cats we prefer warmth and curling up on a comfy bed, luxurious stretches an not worrying about what others think as we scratch ourselves.

~ Jim

Shari Randall said...

I am loving these animal analogies! I think you guys have it right (as I curl up in a blanket with a cup of tea)
Nothing is sweeter than a walk with a little one, feeling that tiny hand in yours.
She's a keeper, Warren.

Kara Cerise said...

How sweet! It's fun to see the world through a child's eyes. My friend's son is fascinated by the water dripping out of the downspout. It's something I never noticed until I walked with him.

Gloria Alden said...


What an adorable child. I'm fortunate enough to live near my great-grandchildren, and my daughter-in-law watches them often. Since my son and daughter-in-law live sort of next door, I have a lot of opportunities to interact with the little ones since they were babies. It's amusing and delightful to see how they react to the world.

KM Rockwood said...

How charming! As they explore their world, young children can always teach us something about discovering (or rediscovering) the magic all around us.