If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our August Author Interviews--8/2 Maggie Toussaint, 8/9 Kellye Garrett, 8/16 Matt Ferraz, 8/23 Matthew Iden, 8/30 Julia Buckley. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.

August Saturday Guest Bloggers: 8/5--Kathleen Kaska, 8/12 Triss Stein, WWK bloggers-Margaret S. Hamilton on 8/19 and Kait Carson on 8/26. Look for E. B. Davis's blog on 8/29--the fifth Tuesday of August.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.”

In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on October, 18, 2017. Look for the interview by E. B. Davis here on that date!

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Saturday, September 27, 2014

As Usual—Juggling



Progress on my novel faltered every time I wrote short stories. In January, I received Ramona
Long’s edits on my manuscript. I vowed to focus on revisions, which were going well until I realized that there were three opportunities for short stories with March 31st deadlines. I caved, wrote the stories, and took myself away from revisions. In addition, I decided to enter my novel, Toasting Fear, into the RWA Daphne Du Maurier Contest in the unpublished paranormal category as that seemed like the best fit. Its deadline, too, was March 31st. I scrambled.

The upshot? I’ve been dealing with a lot of rejection this year. Overcoming fear of failure, keeping a thick skin, and boosting my self-confidence are posted on my “to do” list along with losing weight and going to the gym. A remedy of success would please me more than mantra.

The feedback I received from the Daphne Contest gave me hope. Most of the comments were positive. I received high marks. Trying to present a coherent story, written in four POVs, while adhering to the minimal word count required by the contest elicited a few negative comments. Many of those comments included the word “disjointed.” No kidding. With four POVs, Mission Impossible. But the readers thought it would be a good read despite that problem.    

By the end of March after two months away from my novel, I lost steam and spring chores beckoned. Another editor put out the call for short stories. I again heard the siren’s call, wrote my fourth short story, and submitted it. Today marks the deadline of that last anthology. I’ll know soon whether this fourth one lands in the rejection pile, too.

Spring turned to summer. Although I’d love to call myself a full-time writer, my time isn’t my own. Our business and family comes first. When I first started to write fiction balancing it all was a problem. Nothing has changed. Between real life and blog interviews, five months have passed since I’ve worked on my novel’s revisions. I’ve promised myself and beta readers that I would see this book through.

But then, I have to think of a Christmas short story for this blog.

What is the longest time it has taken you to complete a novel?     

9 comments:

Claire said...

It sounds as if short stories are your stronger calling, but keep at that novel. You don't seem to have a deadline, so let it work it's way through your brain.

I find that there are times when the words don't come because they aren't ready yet. When you've got the edits resolved in your head and are ready, the novel will call almost as strongly as the short stories.

Good luck.

James Montgomery Jackson said...

What's the definition of complete? My current writing task is to rewrite Ant Farm, which will now be a prequel to the Seamus McCree series that started with Bad Policy.

I worked on Ant Farm (originally called Actuarial Gains in late 2002 or early 2003. I hope to publish it in 2015 so that will be over twelve years from start to finish.

But -- I do have numerous short stories that never made it to completion.

Actions often do speak louder than words and your actions seem to indicate you'd prefer to write short stories. Are you writing your novel because you think you should or is it a story you really want to tell or something else?

~ Jim

E. B. Davis said...

This is my third manuscript. It's complete, but I'm still revising. One of my problems is that I don't have time to sit down for eight hours each day. I'd like to consider this my job so I can concentrate on it. Until I can do that, I'm unsure of it and/or a big chicken to release it for public consumption. I'm also a bit of a perfectionist.

I read a lot. One book I downloaded onto my Kindle the other day (a cheap read) had a terrific plot. But the newbie author made a few plunders. That's not who I want to be.

Sure, I like short stories, but I need to get some of my manuscripts to the marketplace. It's more a matter of the time it take to do the forms well. Short stories just don't take the time novels do.

I will complete my revisions. I'm two thirds of the way there.

Kara Cerise said...

Congratulations on the positive feedback from the Daphne Du Maurier Contest and for having the courage to enter your story!

I worked on a novel for two and a half years but wasn't satisfied with the outcome. So, I rewrote it as a screenplay (almost a year) because I'm more creative using that format. After finishing the script I planned to rework the book. But I felt burned out so it's sitting in a drawer patiently waiting for me to regain my motivation.

KM Rockwood said...

I'm with you on the short stories, E.B. My novel sputtered to a halt last spring when I had a few health issues and was having trouble concentrating on a long piece. I wrote a few short stories (three accepted in anthologies, two still out on submission, but usually if they're going to be accepted, that happens quickly) and two more I have partially done and want to submit. Just last night, I got one of them pretty much done, and out to my readers. All of whom will have suggestions, I'm sure.

Then I have 3 novels in various stages of completion. I have a rough draft of the first in a series with a mid-50's woman protagonist, but I have an agent interested in a YA that could turn into a series, so I'm thinking I should concentrate on that.

But it's a nice problem to have, and since I retired in July, I do have more time to pursue writing.

Shari Randall said...

It's great that you got good feedback on your story from the Daphne DuMaurier contest!
And you are already two thirds done with your revisions. My math skills are nothing to shout about, but that means you're mostly done. I keep hearing about people putting themselves in "book jail" until they get a particular project done. I've found a good book jail at my local library - a cramped, dim, brick walled study room that lets in little light or air or distraction. It's perfect. I'm trying to finish a novel too (based on short stories I wrote about 15 years ago!) and I've decided it's book jail for me until it is done. I hope you can find a good book jail and wrap up those revisions.

E. B. Davis said...

I anticipate having a few days in another week. It's surprising how much I can get done when I can find the time without company. Solitary time is the biggest challenge. I have more confidence in it since Ramona edited it in concept and language.

Anonymous said...

E.B. I think it's great you had such positive comments on your Daphne de Maurier submission. That should keep you going.

I can't begin to tell you how long my first book took me because I started it when I was teaching which is a ten hour a day job that melds into weekends, too, with grading papers and planning so much of my writing was only in the summer in between gardening and summer vacations, etc. Then came the years of revisions, etc. My next two books didn't take as long because I had my main characters and many secondary characters fleshed out, and, of course, I've been retired for a few years, too.

Like you, however, I love to read as well has have a lot of other distractions that interfere with writing. For instance, now that the first draft of my 4th book is finished, I should be working on the revisions and final editing which I'm dying to start, but where am I? Vacationing out in California for ten days. Gloria

E. B. Davis said...

Have fun, Gloria! To write an exciting book, the author has to experience life and put it all in the book. Go forth and conquer.