If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our April author interviews: Perennial author Susan Wittig Albert--4/5, Sasscer Hill, horse racing insider--4/12, English historical, cozy author, TE Kinsey--4/19, Debut author, Susan Bickford--4/26.

Saturday Guest Bloggers in April: Heather Baker Weidner (4/1), Christina Hoag (4/8), Susan Boles (4/29). WWK Saturday bloggers write on 4/15--Margaret S. Hamilton and on 4/22--Kait Carson.

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th. In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on June, 13, 2017. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with Linda here in June!

Cross Genre Publications anthology, Hidden Youth, will contain Warren Bull's "The Girl, The Devil, and The Coal Mine." The anthology will be released in late November 2016. The We've Been Trumped anthology released by Dark House Press on September 28th contains Warren Bull's "The Wall" short story and KM Rockwood's "A Phone Call to the White House." KM writes under the name Pat Anne Sirs for this volume.

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Friday, February 14, 2014

Well, Your Honor








Well, you see Your Honor…

I got a summons for jury duty in the mail.  I’ve served on juries before. I was the foreperson once. 

didn’t think I needed the experience again for my writing. Sadly, Henry Fonda was not in the jury pool 

and the experience was nothing like the classic movie Twelve Angry Men. I’ve been called as a 

potential jury member several times. Once I was on a group where two people had police as members 

of their family and one person was “a few fries short of a happy meal,” i.e. a bit loosely wired.    As 

soon as one of the attorneys found out I was a psychologist, I was awarded with the first preemptory 

challenge, i.e. I was politely asked to leave the room and not come back.

Now, as a retired psychologist and an active mystery writer, I’m wondering what I might say to the 

judge to encourage him or her to send me back to my computer screen. I’ve thought about —

"Oh, good. I’m working on a novel about a corrupt judge who gets, stalked, kidnapped, tortured and 

eventually starves to death. Can I take notes?”

“What’s the going rate for jury bribes?”

“Don’t worry. No guilty $#@^# is gonna’ get by me.”

“I know the man always goes after the little guy. Cops always lie.”

“Great! I need to catch up on my sleep anyway.”

I could show up in my p.j.s.

Of could say to another juror, “Hey, want to go hoist a few after trial? This shouldn’t take long.”

Of course I’m open to suggestions. What would you say?


9 comments:

James Montgomery Jackson said...

A lawyer I know asked a group if they were on trial for a crime they did not commit would they want unbiased individuals on their jury.

Most said yes.

The lawyer said he wanted folks biased in his client's favor!

~ Jim

Warren Bull said...

Ah, lawyers. You gotta' love them. Wait. No you don't.

Gloria Alden said...

I was an alternate on a jury 50 years ago. I can't remember the case now, but it was nothing like murder. Then several years ago I was called up as part of at least 100 others to serve on some kind of jury where one person or business was suing the other. They divided us in groups A, B, and C. I went in several times when B was up, but all the cases were settled out of court so I never had to serve.

Warren, I can't come up with anything better than what you suggested. I think I'll save those just in case I'm called for a murder trial. :-)

KM Rockwood said...

So far, I've always been excused as soon as the fact that I have experience in correctional settings come up.

My poor mother once served on a federal jury in a smuggling case involving the port of NY authority. She was in her 70's. Fortunately, one of my brothers lived in Manhattan at the time, so she could stay with him during the week. The blasted trial took over three weeks, and it took her well over an hour on the Long Island Railroad in rush hour to get to the courthouse. Finally they reached jury deliberations, and in the afternoon of the third day, they were interrupted to say that the defendants had accepted a plea bargain. I have never seen my mother quite so furious in her life.

One of my friends was in a jury pool and the question came up whether anyone had ever been involved in a vehicular homocide while driving under the influence case. He stood up. They asked, "Were you found guilty?" He said no, he was an attorney (over the state line) and much of his practice involved defending DUI cases. He was dismissed.

Shari Randall said...

When I was a very young woman living in Boston, I was called to serve on a jury panel. The defendant was a very good looking young guy and it didn't take me long to figure out that the defense was trying very hard to get young women on the jury! They moved 18 of us on - and I was number 22. And good thing for the defendant, because I thought he looked guilty.

Pat M said...

Oh, Warren, where do I begin.

1) Don’t tell them you belong to Sisters in Crime. Didn’t work for my critique partner. Judge just asked her to explain what it was and then kept her on a criminal trial

2) I got off when I said I knew of one of the lawyers because my son was hit by a car in front of his office. Dismissed by the judge. Did I forget to mention it was a personal injury case? LOL

3) I got out of a breach of contact case because my boss at the time was involved in a huge, multi breach of contact suit and I was making all the copies for the court. Dismissed by judge.

4) Hubby got off a vehicular manslaughter case because our kids worked at the health spa on the street where the accident took place.

5) I got on a federal jury when there was only one attorney challenge left. The defending lawyer didn’t want me on the jury because I was the only jury member who knew what hydrogeology was. I thought for sure he’d dismiss me but he dismissed a young girl down the end. The jury foreman told me later, he was paying close attention and the attorney really didn’t want me but the young girl was falling asleep so he chose her. It ended up they settle after one day in court. Jury foreman said the attorneys for the defense really were worried about how I could influence everyone. The case was a company who’d lost already for pollution of the land and this case involved damages for pollution the water table. The really funny question of each juror was, “Do you have a septic system or city sewers where you lived?” Do you know how many people live in the city of Newark NJ who didn’t know which they had? All of them. Amazed me when said they didn’t know.

6) My Mom got off a case where a person had hit a kid on a bicycle. Mom said she had 5 grandchildren and didn’t think she could be impartial. Judge let her go.

7) One time I met a girl who dressed as a hippy to get off. She said her Mom came previously as a bag lady.

Kara Cerise said...

You might say something like, "I will need to conduct my own investigation into this crime if you want me to serve as a juror."

Or, "That guy reeks of guilt. Don't waste taxpayer money on a trial, send him to the slammer."

Sarah Henning said...

I've never been on a jury. The only time I was summoned, they had a call-in number to see if you were "on"...I was never on. I figure if I get there, I'll be exempted anyway because I write for the local paper. Oh well.

Linda Rodriguez said...

I was on a jury in a criminal case when I was younger, but I haven't made it onto a jury in years. Usually they boot me when they find out I was an administrator at the local law school in the 1980s, if they don't do it because I ran the women's center for decades after that. (You can imagine how that goes over with lawyers defending those accused of rape or sexual discrimination.)Tell them you were a consulting psychologist and expert witness, Warren.