If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our September Author Interviews--9/6 Kathleen Valenti, 9/13 David Burnsworth, 9/20 Jeri Westerson, 9/27 Frances Brody. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.

September Saturday Guest Bloggers: 9/2--Anne Bannon, 9/9 WWK Bloggers, 9/16 Margaret S. Hamilton, 9/23 Kait Carson, and on 9/30 Trixie Stiletto.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.” In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.
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Friday, August 23, 2013

Why Attend a "Write Time" when Nobody Talks?


Why Attend A “Write Time” When Nobody Talks?

I went to Cedar Roe Library in Roeland Park, Kansas, from 10:30 to noon recently.  I sat at a table with other people and typed.  There were four tables of people typing, and not talking.  When I got home my wife asked, “How did it go?” I answered. “It went well.”  She then asked, “If nobody talks, why even attend?”

I will attempt to answer that question.  Um.  I know I can sit in my “man cave” by myself and write. I can. I do. It works.

But it is also works to sit in a room with others who are also writing and not talk to them. Organizer Nancy Pickard compares this to “parallel play.” Child development specialists have observed that between roughly 10 to 17 months of age infants start watching other infants playing near them although the infants do not interact. This is a precursor to and a step toward, interactive play - sharing, negotiating and responding to others.

It’s nice to see that others interact with the voices in their heads and work, even though from the outside it may not seem like work at all. There is something emotionally supportive about being in a room with other writers and writing.  It may be true for other art forms too. I’m not sure.  But although writing involves a great deal of “inside the head work” it also requires interaction with others.

Sometimes it is a quiet interaction when the sounds of keys clicking and pens scratching is almost musical.

Does it make sense to you?

Note: I will still be on the other side of the world on safari in Tanzania when this blog goes up. I will read the comments when I return.

3 comments:

Gloria Alden said...

We all have our comfort zones for writing. It's one of the things that makes us unique. Myself, I prefer to write in the environs of my home, but I know lots of people like to write in libraries, cafes or on trains. It's what works for you, Warren.

Paula Gail Benson said...

Warren, I appreciate this perspective. Several of these have taken place in my area, and I've wondered how they work and how productive they are. This helps explain. Thanks.

Kara Cerise said...

I'm more productive when I'm working with other people. When I see someone immersed in writing, it motivates me to do the same.