If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Our reason for creating WWK originated as an outlet for our love of reading and writing mystery fiction. We hope you love it, too, and will enjoy our holiday gifts to our readers with original short stories to celebrate the season. Starting on 11/16 stories by Warren Bull, Margaret S. Hamilton, Paula Gail Benson, Linda Rodriguez, KM Rockwood, Gloria Alden, and E. B. Davis will appear every Thursday into the New Year.


Our November Author Interviews: 11/8--Ellen Byron, and 11/15--Sujata Massey. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.


November Saturday Bloggers: 11/4 Margaret S. Hamilton and 11/11 Cheryl Hollon.


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017 and "Turkey Underfoot," just published, will appear in the anthology The Killer Wore Cranberry: a Fifth Course of Chaos.


James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Thursday, September 6, 2012

Writing About Love

                                                                                  

Fifty Shades of Grey and its follow up books were at the top of the best seller lists for some time and have caused lots of conversations about them. I can't comment on the writing skill of the author bcause I haven't read them, nor do I plan to. But just as fantasy became incredibly popular after Harry Potter and vampires after the Twilight series, I'm predicting a tsunami of romantic porn about to wash over the reading public.

Like many readers, especially women, I think, I like a little romance in the books I read, but I don't find it necessary to enjoy a book. A little sex is okay if it's not overdone with too much in the way of details. It's one of the reasons I write traditional or cozy mysteries. Like the mystery itself, I want hints of romance to come in the first book and like the mystery to be solved, also my curiosity peaked as to if my protagonist and her romantic interest ever get together.

One of the reasons Julia Spencer-Flemings' books have been such a big hit is not only because of the strong characters of Clare Fergusson and Russ Van Alstyne, but also because their attraction for each other seems doomed. She's an Episcopal priest new in town, and he's a married agnostic sheriff. Spencer-Fleming not only skillfully has them joining forces to solve the murder, but has the reader wondering if they'll ever overcome the obstacles they face to eventually be together. For those of you who haven't read her series, I'm not going to give a spoiler alert. It's always best to start with a first book in a series. Hers is In the Bleak Midwinter.


In the first book in my series, The Blue Rose, Catherine Jewell's memory of her husband and twelve year old daughter, who'd both died in an accident ten years before, is still strong. She's not looking for romance. Nor is the police chief, John MacDougal, divorced for fourteen years with full custody of his sixteen year old son. But as the mystery evolves they find themselves together frequently. My critique partners wanted more than developing friendship and the hint of a future romance. I prefer the mystery itself to be the primary focus with the hint of romance being the little bit of added spice.

Their mutual attraction and feelings gradually increase in the next two books, but even though I know I want them to be together someday, I'm in no rush to get them there. Because my books with a gardening theme are following a monthly time line; June for the first book, July for the second and August for the third, it seems reasonable not to rush two mature adults into a hot and torrid romance. Well, even if you don't think that's reasonable, I do write cozies, and won't be writing anything my kids or grandkids would raise their eyebrows over saying "Oh, Mom (or Grandma), I can't believe you wrote that!" No, I won't be writing anything sexy or sleazy. There won't be any hot and torrid scenes, Those are best left to your imagination.

Do you include romance in your writing or not?  As a reader do you like romance in your books? How much?                                                                                    

11 comments:

Maegan said...

I have to say that I agree with what you're saying. In my up-coming thriller, THE FIRST, I hint at a romance between my protagonist and secondary character, but I keep it pretty low-key. When writing a series, allowing relationships to develop at a more natural pace is important. There’s no need to rush things!
Thanks, Gloria—I really enjoyed your blog!

Gloria Alden said...

Thank you Maegan, for stopping by and leaving a comment. Some of my favorite mystery writers use the hint of romance in their novels, too. I'll be looking for your thriller THE FIRST when it comes out.

Sue, your loving daughter said...

I love romance. I guess you can say I'm a hopeless romantic type. I do believe in happily ever after!! I like a little mystery too. That's what makes me wanting to keep reading. If there's mystery, I can't put the book down. I did read the 50 Shades of grey series. Was it good? yes. Was it too much over the top? Yes!! I skimmed over the sex scenes because it got to be too much!!

Gloria Alden said...

You won't find too much of that in my books, Sue. :-) I don't want to shock you or Emilie into thinking I know what that's all about.

E. B. Davis said...

Yes, I like a bit of romance in books because it's all part of giving your books authenticity. The story doesn't have to have romance, but it should include relationships if the character is in a relationship, and if not--tell the reader about the MC's feelings on the subject. Relationships and/or romance is fine, but I'm not a big reader of sex. In fact, I usually skip over the sex because it is aside from the story that I can miss without missing plot points. I have no need to live vicariously!

Gloria Alden said...

I totally agree with you, E.B. Agatha Christie didn't seem to think it was necessary, and look how long she's been popular. P.D. James and Martha Grimes don't write a lot into their books, either, and although Dorothy L. Sayers had her Harriet Vane and Lord Peter Wimsey books, and I was glad to see them finally get together, her books without any romance were great, too. It's the strong characters and like you mentioned, their relationships with others that count. I'm thinking of Elizabeth George's Inspector Tommy Lindsey and his sargeant Barbara Havers. They'll never get together romantically, but their working relationship has developed beautifully.

Warren Bull said...

Hmm,

There seems to be a dearth of comments by those of us who have a Y chromosome. Just an observation.

E. B. Davis said...

So guys don't like romance, Warren? Are you from Jupiter?

Gloria Alden said...

Well, Warrne, I know from what you've written before about your wife and long marriage, that you must have a romantic soul even though you're not commenting on that. :-)

Good comment, E.B.

Patg said...

Not so much, I prefer my books to be about the life of the female protag and her cunning and skill to solve the mystery.
OTOH, sex is good and healthy when two people make the experience good for each other. The problem is, sex is so individual. I've about given up reading it in novels as it can be embarrassing thinking that that particular author thinks THAT is good sex.
I really do not want to read Forty Shades of Grey, but I may have to go 'browse' it at Powell's. They certainly have enough copies in your face no matter what genre section you are in. :)
Patg

Gloria Alden said...

Pat, I prefer my books to be about the life of the female protag, but I still love Lord Peter Wimsey, DI Thomas Lynley, Richard Jury and Homer Kelly to name a few, so it doesn't have to be a female protag.
Actually, Elizabeth George did go a little overboard in PLAYING FOR THE ASHES, but that was mostly when she was developing a very important character,who was a hooker.

As for the book FIFTY SHADES OF GREY, a good friend told me the plot third hand after her boss recounted the whole plot to her. It
was more than the sex that my friend and I object to as much as the bondage and kinky sex that might set back women's rights as young girls reading this think it's romantic.