If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book next year, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our October interviews feature: Kathy Aarons 10/5, Tracy Weber 10/12, Shelley Costa 10/19, and Maggie Toussaint on 10/26.

Saturday Guest Bloggers: Sharon Love Cook 10/1, Leslie Lantry 10/8, and our Saturday Bloggers--10/15 Margaret S. Hamilton, 10/29 Kait Carson. 10/22 will be filled by E. B. Davis.

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Sourthern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on June, 13, 2017. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with Linda here in June!

The We've Been Trumped anthology released by Dark House Press on September 28th contains Warren Bull's "The Wall" short story and KM Rockwood's "A Phone Call to the White House." KM writes under the name Pat Anne Sirs for this volume.

Jim Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available.


Friday, April 27, 2012

If I had not been a writer

If I had not been a Writer

Sometimes I wonder how my life would have changed if I had contented myself with being a writer of interesting letters, a story teller and a reader of books.

I know I would not have had the chance to learn about my father by, as he puts it, “…writing my autobiography.” After I wrote a memoir about a trip my family took to Europe to re-trace his journey as an infantryman in World War II, he reluctantly asked, “…you probably don’t want to do this but…” if I would help him write about his life to leave a legacy to his descendants. Of course I agreed immediately. I had the opportunity to help my father tell the story of his life the way he wanted. I heard details of his life in the army that he had purposely withheld. The process was delayed by my first bone marrow transplant to fight bone marrow cancer. Shortly after we finished to my father's satisfaction, his mental capacities diminished to the point that he would not have been able to tell his story. As a writer I would like to have done many more revisions, but I recognized that it was not my story to tell.
I would not have appeared at a 65th birthday party for a historian dressed as Abraham Lincoln in period clothing. I would not have appeared as a guest speaker for a fourth grade class again dressed in clothing from the 1850’s. (The first question was, “How old are you?”) Nor would I have shown up at an adult service club breakfast where I discussed the just-completed Lincoln-Douglas debates. I would not have been able to explain that candidates financed their own campaigns. When an audience member asked about raising donations from others, I would not have asked sympathetically if he had been out in the sun without wearing his hat and expressed the concern — “Wouldn’t that make politicians beholding to men with the most money to donate?”

If I had not been a writer I would have found it difficult to express the range of emotions associated with chemotherapy and cancer such as despair, helplessness, fear, and the emotional debate I went through at 3:00 AM on a Wednesday to decide if dying was preferable to living given the misery I was in.

You’ve probably guessed the outcome of the debate, but at the time both options had their attraction.
If I had not been a writer I would have missed the encouragement from other writers, independent bookstore owners, readers and the occasional editor. I would have missed the experience of watching my work improve, and the occasional joy of publication, more for validation than for the paltry sums of money involved. I would have missed the friendships I have with other wielders of the pen and the red pencil.

If I had not been a writer, my life would have been less courageous, less interesting and less complete.
What difference has writing made in you life?


E. B. Davis said...

In writing characters and situations, I've come to understand myself more fully. I don't write about myself, but in examining my characters' motivation, creating their situational dilemmas and determining their reactions, I now better understand the mechanics of my own life.

I'm interested in reading a story that stems from your chemotherapy, Warren. I don't believe I've seen such a story--yet. Are you still coming to terms with it, a necessity before writing about it?

Warren Bull said...

I have written a story which includes chemotherapy. It has been accepted but hasn't been published yet.

Jacqueline Seewald said...

Warren, being a writer has helped me come to grips with loss and mortality.

Jessica R. Patch said...

I think there would have been a lot of things I'd never have studied, researched, or experienced.

Warren Bull said...


Writing is therapeutic. You wrote a great post today. I couldn't get on to comment.

Warren Bull said...


You're right. Writing is a great activity for the curious.

GBPool said...

Being a writer is a great way to keep learning and to pass along that knowledge. Too many times at book signings I have heard someone say, "Oh, I never read." I wonder if their brain has shrunk accordingly. Your experiences add richness to your writing. Thanks for giving us a glimpse into your life. We all gain when a writer opens his heart and mind.

Warren Bull said...

Thanks, GBPool. I don't know if someone who never reads shrinks their brain or if it just stops growing when they stop reading.

Anita Page said...

Warren, what a moving piece. Thank you for sharing this.

As for me, if I hadn't been a writer I would have wasted years wishing I'd been brave enough to take the risk.