If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our September Author Interviews--9/6 Kathleen Valenti, 9/13 David Burnsworth, 9/20 Jeri Westerson, 9/27 Frances Brody. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.

September Saturday Guest Bloggers: 9/2--Anne Bannon, 9/9 WWK Bloggers, 9/16 Margaret S. Hamilton, 9/23 Kait Carson, and on 9/30 Trixie Stiletto.


“May 16, 2017 – The Women’s Fiction Writers Association (WFWA) today announced the finalists of the second annual Star Award, given to authors of published women’s fiction. Six finalists were chosen in two categories, General and Outstanding Debut. The winners of the Star Award will be announced at the WFWA Retreat in Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 23, 2017.” In the general category, WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla!

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.
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Tuesday, March 6, 2012

Dressing the Author

What an author wears at a public appearance can help or harm her chances of being remembered. Many will dress in a way to show off their work and catch the eye of those who attend. One author always wears purple. Another dresses as her two protagonists, one on each side. While I thought the woman dressed as her two protagonists looked silly, I have remembered her for almost 20 years.

On Saturday I am going to an author extravaganza at one of the local shopping malls. For once an event that is likely to have actual readers looking at my work. So I have my books together, and some decoration for my table, perhaps a quill pen or a drop spindle.

I have a pile of brochures for the sites that are the inspirations for setting and character. My big question is what do I wear?

I have never been a very classy dresser. Since I retired from my day job, my attire consists of jeans and a tee-shirt. My favorite shirts represent things I have done or places I have been or organizations I belong to. I have a bright red Sisters in Crime shirt, a Dominique chicken shirt, a bunch from various horse events. When I am working at one of the sites, I wear jeans and a proper shirt, Greenbank tee-shirts or Newlin Grist Mill staff polo shirts, or period clothing.

I own a couple of dresses still, and two decent pair of trousers. Nothing matches. When my first book was published I bought a black knit dress that could be worn with any of my jackets and blazers. My author’s little black dress. ALBD for short.

At my first book event, the man at the table next to me was in the Civil War uniform of a Union sergeant. Everyone stopped to talk to him. I don’t know how many books he sold, but he sure drew the crowd’s attention. My ALBD attracted no attention.

Taking a tip from him, I dress in period clothing when ever I can. I can dress to illustrate most of the periods I write, Colonial, New Republic, Civil War and Victorian. If I dress in period clothing I stand in front of the table and greet people as they come by. Often I will have something on my table for them to do, write with a quill pen, try to spin a bit of wool, anything to get their hands busy and their minds working. I am happy to talk about what I am wearing and why.

Tomorrow I will be sitting behind a table with no way out, so period clothing has less impact.

This is what I will be wearing: dressy teal tee-top with narrow lace at the neck edge, off white trousers and my ink pot and pen lovelier. Period clothing next time.

3 comments:

Warren Bull said...

I favor period clothing so people can talk to me while they don't buy my books. My best look is a Guys and Dolls gangster, followed by an 1840s prosperous attorney. For sitting behind a table (a terrible setting) I wonder if you have considered a Charlotte O'Hara broad hat and a hand fan.

Gloria Alden said...

Love your pictures, KB. I enjoy any reenacting experience.

You and Warren are both lucky that you can dress in period clothing for book signings. I agree with Warren, that even behind a table you can dress in something that shows the period. I can't think of anything I could wear as eye catching as what you would wear. I'd feel ridiculous wearing a garden hat and gardening gloves.

Warren Bull said...

i meant Scarlett O'Hara.