If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our April author interviews: Perennial author Susan Wittig Albert--4/5, Sasscer Hill, horse racing insider--4/12, English historical, cozy author, TE Kinsey--4/19, Debut author, Susan Bickford--4/26.

Saturday Guest Bloggers in April: Heather Baker Weidner (4/1), Christina Hoag (4/8), Susan Boles (4/29). WWK Saturday bloggers write on 4/15--Margaret S. Hamilton and on 4/22--Kait Carson.

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th. In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Once a Kappa" was published as a finalist in the Southern Writer's Magazine annual short story contest issue. Mysterical-E published her "Double Crust Corpse" in the Fall 2016 issue. "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

Linda Rodriquez has two pending book publications. Plotting the Character-Driven Novel will be released by Scapegoat Press on November 29th. Every Family Doubt, the fourth Skeet Bannion mystery, is scheduled for release on June, 13, 2017. Look for E. B. Davis's interview with Linda here in June!

Cross Genre Publications anthology, Hidden Youth, will contain Warren Bull's "The Girl, The Devil, and The Coal Mine." The anthology will be released in late November 2016. The We've Been Trumped anthology released by Dark House Press on September 28th contains Warren Bull's "The Wall" short story and KM Rockwood's "A Phone Call to the White House." KM writes under the name Pat Anne Sirs for this volume.

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

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Saturday, October 22, 2011

New Halloween Tales


After reading old Halloween tales a week ago, I wanted to read some newly created tales. I went over to Smashwords.com and downloaded free or inexpensive tales to see if they would meet my fancy. Once downloaded and read, I realized that many of the pages at the end of the stories were advertisements for the author’s novels—I’m so naïve—but, depending on the story, it’s great idea. I dropped one story from my list of those to review because the author actually pleaded with readers to forgive his mistakes. What? Here are the results, and there were a few gems.

“Unholy Cow” by John H. Carroll. (Free)
The story contains some enjoyable deadpan humor and repartee among three evil friends who corrupt a little girl. The author doesn’t follow the usually short story format, resulting in an ending without a twist or conclusion.

“Dumb White Husband vs. Halloween” by Benjamin Wallace (.99)
Another title for this piece could have been “National Lampoon’s Halloween Adventure.” It’s a good tale worth reading with a nice twist at the end—more than worth the price.

Something Spooky This Way Comes ($2.99)
Halloween Short Story Anthology 2010

This volume contains nine tales by nine authors. Most are romance stories, and I have to admit most of them used Halloween as a prop. That’s not to say that the stories were not worthwhile reading, but if you’re looking for spooky tales, this volume won’t provide satisfaction. Most of the writers write well, but the quality varies. Changing tenses seems common in romance stories (as opposed to mystery), and a few of these stories I faulted for that reason. Perhaps, since I’m a mystery reader and writer, that aspect won’t bother romance fans. For me, the following stories were notable:

  • “The UnHaunted House” by Lozi Hart-A short tale, even if the ending was expected, that was well written and executed.
  • “Masked Souls” by Tonya Kappes-A well written love story, again using a Halloween party as backdrop, but it contained a nice taste of revenge that wasn’t too sweet.
  • “Fireside” by J. W. Keleher-A short short-story well written and executed with a surprise ending. Bravo!
  • “A Piece of her Soul” by Magdalena Scott-Another romance story, using Halloween marginally, but the ending contained a good twist. There is a change of POV at the very end that is bothersome. I understood the reason, but I also felt that the author could have handled this need without breaking POV.
  • “Finders Seekers” by Jennifer Johnson-This was an unusual and well written tale set at the time of Halloween and, unlike the other tales, utilized the holiday to provide an emotional basis for one of the character’s feelings and thoughts—well done.
“Love Thy Neighbor: A Halloween Short by L. S. Pierce (Free)
I don’t know of author L. S. Pierce, but she sure can write a good short story. The tale has its twists and an ending that was totally unexpected. Good show!

6 comments:

Pauline Alldred said...

Elaine, thanks for the list. I'm in the process of checking out the many ways of writing an interesting short story. There are writers who think a twist at the end is a gimmick to hide the lack of content in what went before. I don't believe that's always true but then, what is?

E. B. Davis said...

Oh no! A gimmick--no--a twist is a classic ending to a story. It doesn't have to be a twist ending, but when the writer sets up a twist, it's always a nice surprise!

Writing a straight story without withholding anything is fine. But, if the writer gives clues that could end in different scenarios, but ends with the unexpected one, it isn't a cheat or a gimmick, it's genius!

Just proves people will complain about anything--even when a story has consistancy and strength--a surprise ending? Maybe they're just mad because they didn't see it coming. Ha!

Warren Bull said...

Thanks for the list.

E. B. Davis said...

Thanks Warren, are your shorts at Smashwords.com?

Warren Bull said...

Thanks for asking EB,

My short stories will be published by Untreed Reads, but Im not sure when.

E. B. Davis said...

Are they going to e-publish them or is it exclusively a print version? If it isn't e-published, will you get them up on Amazon or Smashwords yourself? If not, why? Sorry, I'm a bit of a bugger tonight! :)