Holiday Short Stories By WWK Authors Presented This Season:

11/30 KM Rockwood's "Holiday Summons"
12/06 "Death By Dictionary" by Gloria Alden
12/12 E. B. Davis's "The Christmas Tree"
12/18 "Femme Fatally Yours" by Paula Gail Benson
12/24 Kara Cerise's "The Ho-Ho Plan"
12/30 "Last Minute Shopping" by Shari Randall

For another free short story, check out E. B. Davis's "The Christmas Cookie Conviction" on Kings River Life online magazine at: http://kingsriverlife.com/12/06/the-christmas-cookie-conviction-a-christmas-mystery-short-story/

Put A Shaker of Margaritas: That Mysterious Woman on your holiday list. Three WWK authors have short stories in this Mozark Press anthology. Look for "Moving On" by Paula Gail Benson, "Sauna" by KM Rockwood, and "Wishing For Ignorance" by E. B. Davis. Paper or eformat are available at Amazon.


Gloria Alden has released the fourth book, The Body in the Goldenrod, in her Catherine Jewel series. It's available in print and in eformat. Here are two links to the book: Amazon and Kobo. Put it on your "TBR" or Christmas list!

Carla Damron's latest project, THE STONE NECKLACE, a literary novel about five lives that intersect, and are forever changed, by a senseless accident, has been picked up by Story River Books for publication in 2016. Story River is an arm of the University of South Carolina Press and is under the leadership of editor-in-chief author Pat Conroy. Congratulations, Carla!


A great stocking stuffer, Chesapeake Crimes: Homicidal Holidays is available at Wildside Press or Amazon. This anthology includes short stories by WWK bloggers Shari Randall ("Disco Donna") and E. B. Davis ("Compromised Circumstances").
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Monday, October 31, 2011

Hiding Sin

As a writer, do you find yourself sneaking and hiding your sins? What sins you ask? For mystery writers there are many sins. My husband becomes alarmed by my research, which I occasionally print if it is a short piece from the Internet. Then, forgetting the subject matter, I casually place the piece on my desk in full view of any passerby to see. My research on spousal abuse caused my husband’s eyes to open wide in wonder and with question. Researching expensive champagnes for my WIP caused a sharp intake of his breath.

But my worst sin is one that is politically incorrect and ecologically unsound—I use paper at an alarming rate because I don’t seem to be able to revise my work without printing and reading it on paper. While emptying my trash can yesterday, I heard him say, "There goes another tree."

Since I don’t yet have an e-reader (I hear a collective gasp—Christmas will solve the problem.) when I download reading material to enjoy, I end up printing it to read. Sometimes when interviewing authors for WWK, I obtain manuscripts via email attachments from the authors, which I love because I don’t have to pay for the work, but I end up printing the book’s pages because reading a 250+ work isn’t at all enjoyable on the screen. Of course, it does cost me money in paper and ink, but that expense is less than buying the books.

I try to minimize the paper I used by reprinting on the opposite side. While this minimizes the paper I use, it can also be a pain because used paper causes my printer to jam. In the D.C. area where I live, we’ve had too much rain in the past two months. I often work on my screen porch. Add these two situations and it equals paper laden with moisture that my printer rejects. Don’t take my word for it, try it!

There are times when I end up with reams of paper that must be thrown out, and although I should put it in my recycling container, I end up hiding it. Like cleaning out the junk drawer, it happens periodically when messy build up can no longer be denied, and then I think of ways that I can dispose of the paper without my husband finding out. Sometimes I put it in my car and drive it to business dumpsters. In the winter while we have our woodstove burning, I’ll throw some in to burn, even though it creates more smoke than wood (the chemistry of which is beyond me since paper is a refined product of wood). I’ve packed it in my suitcase when going on trips by myself to be disposed in hotel cans or in my friends’ trash (but don’t tell them). It sounds ridiculous, but hiding this sin has been my way of dealing with my guilt at using so much paper.

How do you hide your writing sins?

8 comments:

Warren Bull said...

But, EB,

Just think of the sins you might commit that you don't because you are writing. As an addiction it is quite cheap and relatively harmless. Isn't it better to write some idiot into your work and knock him/her off than to actually do the deed?

E. B. Davis said...

That's so true, Warren. Researching those champagnes has cost a bit more than I anticipated. But then, I mostly wear jeans and teeshirts or sweatshirts at this time of year, so maybe my research has been cheap!

Kaye George said...

I haven't exactly hidden all the paper in office. It is a fire hazard, though. Hubby takes a stack of newspapers to recycle every week or so. Why have I not thought of putting my papers on that stack? Not all at once, I think.

towriteistowrite said...

I don't print as much since I bought a printer that drinks ink. But I do sin. The worst is starting online research and ending up surfing down bunny trails. And calling it writing.

E. B. Davis said...

Kaye--I think the reason we don't think to recycle printing paper is that mostly newspapers are in the recycling bin. I don't think of it as I should also. Instead of the wastecan, I should have a bin for recycling in my office.

towriteistowrite-yes, we've all gone down that bunny trail. I ended up researching persimmons yesterday. We had been on the road and stopped at a rest area in VA. A tree bearing fruit caught my attention and when I got home, I just had to find out what it was--so, no I didn't get anything done over the weekend on my WIP. But I do know that Native American's made persimmon beer way back when!

Warren Bull said...

Early settlers also made beer from acorns, assuming like it Europe, it would be dangerous or even fatal to drink the water. Surely someday, somehow that will go into a story.

E. B. Davis said...

WOT-But persimmons must be ripe, preferably after a hard frost ripe, to be palitable. They adjectives to describe them are astringent, or here's what John Smith said.

"If it be not ripe it will drawe a mans mouth awrie with much torment; but when it is ripe, it is as delicious as an Apricock," wrote Captain John Smith about an unusual orange fruit the settlers in Jamestown discovered."

www.wildmanstevebrill.com

E. B. Davis said...

Sorry--that was way off topic...so many sins, so little time!