If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.


Our reason for creating WWK originated as an outlet for our love of reading and writing mystery fiction. We hope you love it, too, and will enjoy our holiday gifts to our readers with original short stories to celebrate the season. Starting on 11/16 stories by Warren Bull, Margaret S. Hamilton, Paula Gail Benson, Linda Rodriguez, KM Rockwood, Gloria Alden, and E. B. Davis will appear every Thursday into the New Year.


Our November Author Interviews: 11/8--Ellen Byron, and 11/15--Sujata Massey. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.


November Saturday Bloggers: 11/4 Margaret S. Hamilton and 11/11 Cheryl Hollon.


Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.


In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017 and "Turkey Underfoot," just published, will appear in the anthology The Killer Wore Cranberry: a Fifth Course of Chaos.


James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Playing the what if game

Watching the news today, I saw a story about a daughter who found her family after being taken from the hospital by a woman when the baby was 19 days old. This could make a good story—someone snatches your baby. They sell the baby. It’s a baby selling ring. The mother could get into many dangerous situations trying to locate her baby. No one wants to help her. She must find the baby on her own. Maybe ten years later she becomes a police woman or joins the FBI to find her child.

I once sold a story to True Story about a mother who had twins and the doctor sold one of them. I got that idea when I had my first child—before the days when they took pictures of the baby before birth. We had no way back then to know if you were having twins. I had gained a lot of weight and when I gave birth they told my husband we had a daughter. Later someone else came out and said he had a son. He asked if we had twins. I was knocked out and had no idea what was going on. Finally someone came out and said we had a son, no daughter.

I was so out of it with way too much gas or whatever they gave you back then, that I was telling Sir Arthur how he couldn’t behead me now that I gave him a son.

Fast forward thirty years later. I read a story in the newspaper where they told about doctors who sold babies and no one was the wiser. There was no way to trace this. The Doctor I had was known for losing babies and a few mothers. My husband was in the Air Force in Oklahoma. They didn’t have a maternity ward at the base and we had to use a town doctor. The story I read fit the scene I had heard many times when we lived in that town about parents being told the baby supposedly died. But this doctor was the only doctor in town who delivered babies. We later heard he had been taken off the list of doctors for the Air Force, but the only other doctor in that small town had a heart attack and couldn’t work. This, I had Dr. Livingston.
That made me think—did we really have twins and the doctor sold our other baby? We were young and poor and they knew we would have no way to discover if this had happened. Of course, in the story I sold I had that happy ending where the child found his family—just like the girl in the news today.

If you are struggling for a story idea, go back to your past and remember things that happened to you or a friend. Then play the “what if” game. What if your mother wasn’t really your mother? Did folks often tell you how you didn’t look like anyone else in the family? How different were you from them?

Or what about that family painting no one wanted to talk about—the one that looked a lot like one you’d seen on the news that had been stolen 20 years ago—the one that sat in your aunt’s attic.

Sit down and make a list of “what if’s” and I’ll bet you come up with a lot of potential ideas.
Now, if someone finds a woman in Oklahoma who wonders who her real parents are…

4 comments:

Pauline Alldred said...

What a scary experience you had giving birth. Even though one of my friends gave birth in a large,urban hospital, she told her husband to follow their newborn everywhere in case she was stolen. Mothers feel protective right away but they're not in a position to guard their newborn so it's easy to take advantage of them.

Too many stories that end badly might have women wanting to give birth at home.

E. B. Davis said...

I play the "What if" game too. But usually I reserve my "what ifs" for honing the plot. I'll have my story outline and use the "what ifs" to create complications. It's a fun game and the possibilities are endless. Wondering how your main character will react to "what ifs" also helps determine which you pick. Finding just the right "what if" fills out the plot while showing an interesting aspect of your character. Great game!

Warren Bull said...

Newspaper articles are wonderful sources of "What ifs."
I remember a local fertility specialist who apparently used his own sperm with couples who were having difficulties. He fled the country and commented that "people worry too much about genetics anyway."

Lorna said...

Oh my God Dee! I never knew that story. Hey, maybe I'm your long lost daughter? Maybe that's why we hit it off from the start? Though I'm afraid I never lived in that area.

But now, my sister has always said she wasn't from my family, and what if that were true? The "what if" question really makes you think. A creative mind could go far with that question.

Thanks for the interesting subject. I enjoyed it very much.