If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com

Our October Author Interviews--10/4 Wendy Tyson, 10/11 Marilyn Levinson, 10/18 Earl Javorski, 10/25 Linda Lovely. Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.


October Saturday Guest Bloggers: 10/7 Mark Bacon, 10/14 Elaine Orr, 10/21 WWK's Margaret S. Hamilton, 10/28 Kait Carson, and E. B. Davis 10/31 to fill out our fifth Tuesday.


WWK’s Carla Damron was one of three finalist for her novel, The Stone Necklace. Go to Carladamron.com for more information. Congratulations, Carla! Look for Carla's blog this month to find out the winner.

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Warren Bull's new Lincoln mystery, Abraham Lincoln In Court & Campaign has been released. Look for the Kindle version on February 3.

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

In addition, our prolific KM will have the following shorts published as well: "Sight Unseen" in Fish Out of Water, Guppie (SinC) anthology, just released, and "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017.

Margaret S. Hamilton's short story, "Baby Killer" will appear in the 2017 solar eclipse anthology Day of the Dark to be published this summer prior to the eclipse in August.

James M. Jackson's 4th book in the Seamus McCree series, Doubtful Relations, is now available. His novella "Low Tide at Tybee" appears February 7 as part of Lowcountry Crimes: Four Novellas, which is available for order.
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Friday, November 26, 2010

Scripture Cake


Scripture Cake

One of the many pleasures of reading Sharyn McCrumb’s Appalachian Ballad novels is learning about the legends and customs of the people who live in the Appalachian Mountains. For example, Nora Bonesteel bakes a Scripture Cake in The Rosewood Casket.

She (Sharyn, not Nora) gave me permission to share it here. She also warned me if I got the recipe wrong I would hear about it from readers. She told me her book had inspired bakers on four continents.

4 ½ cups: 1 Kings 4:22

I cup: Judges 5:25

2 cups: Jeremiah 6:20

2 cups: 1 Samuel 30:12

2 cups: Nahum 3:12

2 cups: Numbers 17:8

2 tbsp: 1 Samuel 14:25

pinch: Leviticus 2:13

½ cup: Judges 4:19

2 tbsp: Amos 4:5

6 of: Jeremiah 17:11

Mix like a fruitcake and at 350 degrees for 50 minutes, or until done.


A slightly different version for those who don’t want to thumb through their bibles:

Ingredients:

½ cup butter, Judges 5:25

1 ½ cups white sugar, Jeremiah 6:20

3 eggs, Isaiah 10:14

2 cup[s all-purpose flower, 2 Kings 4:22

2 teaspoons baking powder, Luke 13:21

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, 1 Kings 10:10

1 teaspoon ground mace, 1 Kings 10:10

1 teaspoon ground cloves, 1 Kings 10:10

½ teaspoon salt, Leviticus 2:13

½ cup water, Genesis, 43:24

1 tablespoon honey, Proverbs 24:13

I cup figs, 1Samuel 30:11

1 cup raisins, 1 Samuel 30:11

½ cup almonds, Genesis 43:11

Blend butter, sugar, spices and salt. Beat egg yokes and add. Sift in baking powder and flour, then add water and honey. Put fruits and nuts through a food processor and flour well. Fold in stiffly beaten egg whites. Pour into a 13 x 9-inch pan and bake at 375 degrees F for one hour.

Enjoy!

3 comments:

Pauline Alldred said...

I remember reading about Appalachian history and customs. Fascinating. I'll certainly try out the cake for one of my potluck parties this season.

E. B. Davis said...

I have read a few of Sharyn McCrumb's books and have liked them. The only part of the recipe I doubt is the baking powder. Wasn't most bread of that region and era, unleavened bread? Oh well, it's quite clever anyway!

Polly said...

Elaine, there was leaven/yeast during that time. When the Israelites fled Egypt, they didn't have time to put leaven in their bread, hence, matzoh. Otherwise, they would have had a version of bread. Still, I'm glad Warren wrote the non-biblical ingredients of the cake. I'm on my way to buy figs. The cake sounds really good, though I'm not a big nut person. Just a nut.