If you are interested in blogging or want to promote your book, please contact E. B. Davis at writerswhokill@gmail.com.

Check out our March author interviews: 3/7--Karen Cantwell, 3/14--Shawn Reilly, 3/21--Annette Dashofy, and 3/28--WWK Blogger Debra Sennefelder (on her debut novel!). Please join us in welcoming these authors to WWK.

Our March Saturday Guest Blogger Schedule: 3/3-Heather Weidner, 3/10-Holly Chaille, 3/17-Margaret S. Hamilton, 3/24-Kait Carson, 3/31-Charles Saltzberg.

Congratulations to our writers for the following publications:

Tina Whittle's sixth Tai Randolph mystery, Necessary Ends, debuts on April 3, 2018. Look for it here: https://www.amazon.com/Necessary-Ends-Tai-Randolph-Book-ebook/dp/B079MS67CM/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1520014972&sr=8-2&keywords=Tina+Whittle

James M. Jackson's Empty Promises, the next in the Seamus McCree mystery series (5th), will be available on April 3, 2018 at: https://www.amazon.com/Empty-Promises-Seamus-McCree-Book-ebook/dp/B078XJRYDG/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1520089649&sr=8-2&keywords=James+M.+Jackson&dpID=51kcxPsst-L&preST=_SY445_QL70_&dpSrc=srch

Dark Sister, a poetry collection, is Linda Rodriguez's tenth published book. It's available for sale here: https://mammothpublications.net/writers-m-to-z/rodriguez-linda-dark-sister/

Shari Randall's "Pets" will be included in Chesapeake Crimes: Fur, Feathers, and Felonies anthology, which will be published in 2018. In the same anthology "Rasputin," KM Rockwood's short story, will also be published. Her short story "Goldie" will be published in the Busted anthology, which will be released by Level Best Books on April 25th.

Shari Randall's second Lobster Shack Mystery, Against the Claw, will be available in August, 2018.

In addition, our prolific KM has had the following shorts published as well: "Making Tracks" in Passport to Murder, Bouchercon anthology, October 2017 and "Turkey Underfoot," appears in the anthology The Killer Wore Cranberry: A Fifth Course of Chaos.


Tuesday, August 3, 2010

Jim Colors Chapter 1

I read Ramona’s post from July 23rd with interest. Being a visual thinker and a math guy (see my last post), Ramona’s First Chapter Coloring Project fit both parts of my personality.

After buying my tools, I made my first discovery: yellow and green from this set look too similar to be useful, so I substituted orange for green and followed Ramona’s rules:

Blue for Action
Orange for Dialogue
Yellow for Description
Pink for Background

I’m sure I miscolored some lines, but in my first chapter of 2,145 words and 143 lines, I found

58 Action lines
40 Dialogue lines
30 Description lines
11 Backstory lines
4 Backstory lines contained in dialogue

Oh good, I thought. It’s a nice mix and having only 10% backstory (some of which was nicely hidden in dialogue) is surely acceptable. The longest continuous backstory lasts only four lines. I was golden.

Then I looked at that four line chunk and asked questions.

Was it important information? Yes. Crucial for the reader to understand at the point I added it? Errrr, not exactly. Instead of eliciting this four line history dump with a question from a minor character, I can have my protagonist get defensive and provide this same information in a later scene when a cop questions him, upping the tension of that scene.

Then I looked at the 4 lines of backstory concealed as dialogue. Same questions; same answers.

Of fifteen lines of backstory, all are important for my readers to understand. For seven, the best place (I think) is right where I have them. Two take up one line, one takes up two lines and the third uses three lines.

I’m about to transfer the other eight lines and start coloring chapter 2.

~ Jim


Ramona said...

Jim, that colored manuscript is beautiful!

Kaye George said...

Jim, you might not know it from reading my first drafts, but I do a color coding, too. It reveals a lot!

Maybe I should do it before I send my chapters out?

James Montgomery Jackson said...

I'm not sure I would bother coloring my first draft, which is an attempt to get my story down on paper.

In the second draft I attempt to straighten out plot points, character arcs and other major problems I introduced in draft 1.

Only on the third draft do I really start editing -- but maybe that's not a good idea.

Thoughts on when to first pull out the crayons?

~ Jim